Tiramisù . . . Chocolate Orange Version

Chocolate Orange Tiramisu

Ingredients

2 Eggs
250g/8 oz Mascarpone
A packet of Savoiardi (Lady Fingers)
2 Tablespoons of Sugar
50g Dark Chocolate
2 Tbsp Chocolate Milk Powder
200ml whole milk
100g White Chocolate
Zest from one Orange

Instructions

  • Put the whole milk and chocolate milk powder in a saucepan and heat gently. Add the orange zest and once mixed simmer for a couple of minutes then take off the heat and leave to cool. Strain to remove the zest.
  • Chop the chocolate finely. Do not grate. The texture adds to the dish.
  • Separate the eggs into yolks and whites.
  • Add a tiny pinch of salt to the whites. Beat the egg whites until they are stiff. Set aside.
  • Beat the egg yolks with the sugar to form a creamy paste. Add the mascarpone and stir. Gently fold in the egg whites. Set aside.
  • Dip each lady finger in the chocolate milk/orange mix to soak (not too much . . . they shouldn’t be soggy). Arrange the soaked biscuits into one layer in a serving dish.
  • Once you have the layer of soaked biscuits cover with a layer of the cream mix.
  • Sprinkle with the chocolate. Repeat the process until the dish is full.
  • In each layer you could also add a few pieces of caramelised orange zest (see below*). This adds a little crunch to contrast with the all the cream and adds more ornage flavour to the dish.
  • Finish by decorating with a couple of slices of orange.
  • Cool in the fridge for at least two hours before serving.
  • Please note that this is a dish that should be eaten the same day that it is made as it is made with raw eggs and other dairy products.

*Optional: Caramelised Orange Zest: In a saucepan put 20ml water, 2 tbsp sugar and the zest of one
orange. Heat gently until the sugar melts then becomes a syrup. Take off the heat, seive so that you are
left with the sticky zest. Place the zest on parchment paper on a tray then put in the oven for an hour on
a very low heat. Leave to cool and you’ll have crunchy pieces of zest which you can then crumble and
add into your tiramisù layers. It can be kept in a jar in the fridge for a couple of weeks so can be made in
advance.

Serves 4 – 6

Tiramisù al Limone/Limoncello

Limoncello Tiramisu

Ingredients

2 Eggs
250g/8 oz Mascarpone
A packet of Savoiardi (Lady Fingers)
2 Tablespoons of Sugar
Zest of 1 Lemon
Lemon Pulp “Vesicles”
200ml whole milk
100g White Chocolate
10ml & 1 tsp of Limoncel

Instructions

  • Put the whole milk and 10ml of Limoncello in a dish.
  • Chop the chocolate finely. Do not grate. The texture adds to the dish.
  • Separate the eggs into yolks and whites.
  • Add a tiny pinch of salt to the whites. Beat the egg whites until they are stiff.
    Set aside.
  • Beat the egg yolks with the sugar to form a creamy paste. Add the mascarpone and stir. Add the teaspoon of limoncello and mix in. Gently fold in the egg whites. Set aside.
  • Dip each lady finger in the milk/limoncello mix to soak (not too much . . . they shouldn’t be soggy). Arrange the soaked biscuits into one layer in a serving dish.
  • Once you have the layer of soaked biscuits cover with a layer of the cream mix. Sprinkle with the white chocolate. Repeat the process until the dish is full.
  • In each layer add a few vesicles of pulp from the lemon (literally the single teardop pieces of lemon). Just a very few in each layer to add a burst of acidity which contrasts with the sweetness of the biscuits and the cream and chocolate.
  • Finish by decorating with a couple of slices of lemon.
  • Cool in the fridge for at least two hours before serving.
  • Please note that this is a dish that should be eaten the same day that it is made as it is made with raw eggs and other dairy products.

Serves 4 – 6

Tiramisù alla Frutta

Fruit Tiramisu

Ingredients

2 Eggs
250g/8 oz Mascarpone
A packet of Savoiardi (Lady Fingers)
2 Tablespoons of Sugar
100g Fresh Fruit
100ml Fresh Fruit Juice
Shot of Desert Wine / Liquor

Instructions

  • I usually make my own mixed fresh fruit juice (with a juicer), using some of the chosen fruit for the tiramisù, some oranges and any other fruit I have on hand.
  • Otherwise use a ready made mixed juice.
  • Add the desert wine/liquor to the juice.
  • Slice your fresh fruit, set aside. This recipe works best with fruits that are a little tart such as strawberries, pineapple, raspberries.
  • Separate the eggs into yolks and whites.
  • Add a tiny pinch of salt to the whites. Beat the egg whites until they are stiff. Set aside.
  • Beat the egg yolks with the sugar to form a creamy paste. Add the mascarpone and stir. Fold in the egg whites. Set aside.
  • Dip each lady finger in the juice mix to soak. Arrange the soaked biscuits into one layer in a serving dish.
  • Once you have the layer of soaked biscuits cover with a layer of the cream mix. Now do a layer with the sliced fresh fruit. Repeat the process until the dish is full.
  • Finish with a fruit layer on top. Cover with cling film.
  • Cool in the fridge for at least two hours before serving.
  • Please note that this is a dish that should be eaten the same day that it is made as it is made with raw eggs.

Serves 4 – 6

Taste Tuscany Tiramisù variations

We’ve been experimenting this year with Tiramisù, creating alternative flavours to the classic coffee. The basic cream remains unchanged and the structure of the Tiramisù too, but we’ve got some great new combinations for dunking the savoiardi (lady fingers) and layering between the cream and biscuits.

Why not have a go – recipes here below – and if you’re feeling adventurous try out some ideas of your own and let us know if you come up with something delicious!

Fruit Tiramisu

 

Limoncello Tiramisu

Chocolate Orange Tiramisu

 

 

Marmalade Crostata

Marmalade CrostataThis is a simple Tuscan cake often served as a dessert. It can be made with any type of marmalade and if it’s home made marmalade then even better.

The history behind the Crostata is unclear with some saying it was a gift from grateful habitants of Napoli to a pagan goddess of the sea in pre-Christian times, created from ingredients that symbolised strength and richness (flour), rejuvenation of life (eggs) and the sweetness of the siren’s song (sugar). Other legends place the Crostata as an Easter tradition; the cake that finally brought a smile to the face of the Queen of Austria when Ferdinando II di Borboni was king – he declared it as an Easter dessert to guarantee his wife’s smile at least once a year; or a symbol of the resurrection of Christ created in the ancient convent of San Gregorio Armeno.

In any case it became a popular dessert to exchange among friends at Easter and as such over time different versions were created as each person wanted to make their gift slightly different. Now you will often see it on menus all year round and especially at events such as harvest festivals and Easter of course.

Ingredients

3 Eggs
200g Butter
200g Sugar
350/4oog Plain Flour
1 teaspoon grated lemon rind
1 Tablespoon Baking Powder
One small cup Vermouth
250g Marmalade

Instructions

  • Beat/whisk the eggs with the sugar. Add the butter and mix well into a creamy consistency. Add the flour and the baking powder a little at time, mixing well. Add the lemon rind and vermouth.
  • Once you have a smooth dough set aside a quarter of it then roll the remainder to form the base of the Crostata. Put into a baking tin/flan case – round or square as you please.
  • Spread a generous amount of marmalade across the whole of the dough base.
  • With the set aside dough roll then flatten strips and place across the top of the marmalade to make a lattice pattern.
  • Cook at 180°C/350°F for 20/25minutes until the lattice is golden brown.
  • Serve warm or cold as preferred with cream or ice cream.

Serves: 4 – 6